France protests: clashes with police on Bastille Day amid anger at tighter Covid rules - International Burch University
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France protests: clashes with police on Bastille Day amid anger at tighter Covid rules

Demonstrations in Paris and other cities over plan for mandatory vaccinations for health workers and vaccine pass for public places

Police have fired teargas to disperse demonstrators in Paris, as thousands of people protested throughout France over new coronavirus restrictions.

Protests began in the French capital on Wednesday morning as the annual military parade for the traditional Bastille Day parade was taking place along the famous Champs-Élysées watched by president Emmanuel Macron.

A nurse administers a Pfizer vaccine to a durian fruit vendor at his house in rural Malaysia

The demonstrators are unhappy at the decision announced on Monday to oblige health workers to get vaccinated and bring in a vaccine health pass for most public places.

Unvaccinated people would require, for example, a negative test result to enter restaurants.

A protesters tries to kick in the window of a shop in Paris.
A protesters tries to kick in the window of a shop in Paris. Photograph: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Since the announcement a record number of French people booked appointments for Covid-19 jabs.

“This is in the name of freedom” was the message from some of the protesters.

In one area of the French capital police fired teargas to disperse the crowd.

The declared route was not respected, the prefecture of police said in a tweet, condemning the “throwing of projectiles” and lighting of fires by the protesters.

Throughout Paris some 2,250 people protested, while other demonstrations took place in Toulouse, Bordeaux, Montpelier, Nantes and elsewhere. The French authorities put the total number of protesters at 19,000.

About 55% of all Americans are fully vaccinated against Covid-19, according to the CDC.

The interior ministry said that there were altogether 53 different protests throughout France.

“Down with dictatorship”, “down with the health pass” protesters chanted.

One of them, Yann Fontaine, a 29-year-old notary’s clerk from the Berry region in central France, said he had come to demonstrate in Paris arguing that the imposition of a health pass equalled “segregation”.

Police and protesters in Paris.
Police and protesters in Paris. Photograph: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

“Macron plays on fears, it’s revolting. I know people who will now get vaccinated just so that they can take their children to the movies, not to protect others from serious forms of Covid,” he said.Advertisementhttps://030b4e82753a8d8421a8376b94037cc3.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html

The French government on Tuesday defended its decision to impose Covid tests for unvaccinated people who want to eat in restaurants or take long-distance trips, as the country looks to avoid a surge in more contagious Delta cases.

“There isn’t any vaccine obligation, this is maximum inducement,” government spokesman Gabriel Attal said then.

“I have a hard time understanding, in a country where 11 vaccines are already mandatory… that this could be seen as a dictatorship,” he said, adding that after a year of studying the vaccines “the time of doubting is long past”.

The rules will be relaxed for teenagers who have only been able to get the jabs since mid-June – “Making summer hell is out of the question,” Attal said.

According to an Elabe opinion poll published Tuesday, the new safety measures have a large majority of approval amongst French people.

Around 35.5 million people – almost half of France’s population – have received at least one vaccine dose so far.

At the start of the pandemic, France had some of the highest levels of vaccine scepticism in the developed world.

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Source https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jul/15/france-protests-clashes-with-police-on-bastille-day-amid-anger-at-tighter-covid-rules

Department of International Relations and European Studies https://www.ibu.edu.ba/department-of-international-relations-and-european-studies/